Energy Timeline

Below you will find a timeline created on a site called dipity. This site allows us to create collaborative timelines. The grade 6 science curriculum requires us to “evaluate the impact of the use of electricity on both the way we live and the environment”, and “demonstrate an understanding of the principles of electrical energy and its transformation into and from other forms of energy”.

Using the timeline, your task is to contribute five events that examine one or both of these overall expectations. These events can explore past milestones in the energy sector (the invention of a different source of energy), environmental concerns (disasters relating to the creation or distribution of energy), the process of converting a specific form of energy into a distributable resource, or potential future energy sources.

Each one of your events must include a title, a date, a description, and at least three of the available four content fields:

Make note of the events you add. Once you have added five events, you will create a blog entry explaining their importance and justifying their inclusion on the timeline. You will need to create a username on dipity before you are able to start contributing content. Once you are a user, you will be able to create content using the “Add an Event” button in the top left corner of the timeline.

Energy on Dipity.

Hosting the Olympics

Think about what you know about the Olympic games: What are the positive aspects of having the Olympics occur in your city or country? Why do you think countries compete to host the Olympic games?

Why would some groups be opposed to the Olympics? Read the post on this site and respond to what you have read. Remember to link back to the article in question whenever appropriate, citing your sources so as to avoid plagiarism.

Has this article changed your opinion of the Winter Olympics? If not, are there articles you could use to convince the author of this post of the positives of the Olympic games.

Be it resolved…

Every year we are asked to “look inward” and resolve to make changes. This is an important activity regardless of the time of year; we should “resolve” to make small changes daily, weekly, and monthly: rather than once a year. I’m not saying you should not make a New Year’s Resolution: what better time than the present to resolve/decide to change something for the better? If you have not made a New Year’s Resolution, make one now, and blog about what you have decided to do this year that is different than how you have carried on in the past.

Make your resolution attainable. Make it a short term goal. Sweeping statements invoking 180 degree turns in habits and attitudes rarely stick (why set yourself up for failure).

Once you have identified your own resolution, make a resolution for the world. How would you like to see others change as we enter this new decade? Using our Blogging template…

1) Start with a reaction.

2) Back up that reaction with points of proof.

3) Provide solutions, conclusions, or further questions for inquiry.

… react to the video below. What does it make you think about? What would you write on your hand as a collaborator on a project like this? Why would the world be a better place if we were all empathetic?

New Adventure

Welcome to Litcircuits.com: a new space designed to help create connections among student authors and readers, through shared literary experience. We hope to create opportunities to discuss books, muse about media texts, or share creative work in a safe, educational space.

Given that mandate, a climate of high expectations abounds. Use care when publishing work, when contributing to forums, and when commenting on the output of other writers: when we are all submitting our best, we must also strive to be kind and constructive in our responses to the work of our fellow authors. When we share our writing, we open ourselves up to scrutiny, in the hopes of gaining praise.

Welcome!

mrjarbenne